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are watching "bbc world news america," still to come -- the u.s. education system is slipping down the global rankings. we talked to one woman with radical ideas for an overhaul. life like robotic patients are used by doctors and nurses in the uk who want to practice their clinical skills. they suffer from a range of problems like asthma and severe infections. >> john is sick. he has been in a car crash and he is struggling to breathe. these doctors are trying to figure out what to do. if they cannot, no one dies. these robots are different. they are controlled to react to treatment second by second. "although we are taught in books what to do in certain situations, is very different when you have equipment, and you have people talking to you. run through.way to >> there are other members of the family. he can heartbeat -- he can have a heartbeat and describe the symptoms. it is cutting edge technology. it's not the only new technology here. the robots are on patrol. they're setting up and delivering the tea and coffee. they also are sorting the mail and they have revolutionized the policy. >
francisco" and we believe that a right to a education is i social justice issue and if you deny that you're denying their civil rights. that's how we feel about being proactive. now there is a line of demarcation happens and we want to be proactive i know jill is looking at me. when the event happens and there is harm that occurs we believe in restorative practices and repairing the harm. we don't believe in kicks kids out of school. that's not a solution. we are an educational institution. we go through this process and the perpetrator understands the damage and make it right to the victim. it's not okay shake hands. it's a whole process. you talk about it and process what is happening and people follow up on that, so we very much believe in this restorative process in san francisco and how do we know? because of the indicators that should be going up are going up and the others are going down. our truancies are down. suspensions are down and students in class is going up. thank you for being here. [applause] >> okay. that's okay. you jumped ahead to several of my questions s
or opportunities? with an advanced degree in education from capella university, you'll have the knowledge to meet these challenges and make a difference in the lives of students. let's get started at capella.edu. >>> even as it seems that many republican politicians are johnny come latelies to the issue of immigration reform, there are conservative advocates on this issue for some time and most notably former governor of florida jeb bush has been pushing the party to more warmly embrace the latino electorate. next month, former governor bush and his partner at the goldwater institute will release their book "immigration wars, forging an american solution" and last week they penned an op-ed in the "wall street journal," that in some conservative circles the word comprehensive immigration reform is an epithet-a code word for amnesty. people who have such declaration s when associated with the border states are moving toward something more. go and now the author is joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> you have said that the legislation act since 1952 has not held up well and in short, we need
began. >> i have the right of education. i have the right to play. i have the right to sing. i have the right to talk. i have the right to speak up. >> reporter: her actions made her a target. last october, on her way home from school, she was brutally attacked. gunmen entered her van and shot her at point blank range in the head. she was medevaced to england in critical condition, but she refused to die. the bullet had glanced off her skull, traveled down her cheek and into her shoulder. incredibly, it didn't enter her brain. as her story spread, so did her following. i spoke with her father, a schoolteacher himself. malala has become a hero. she has now triggered a huge movement around the world. she gets letters from children. >> malala is incredible. >> reporter: they have made videos for her. had you ever imagined it would be this kind of reaction to what happened to her? >> i think malala is an inspiration for the children all over the world. when she fell, pakistan stood and the whole world supported her. >> reporter: today, malala was sitting up in bed after five hours of su
committee to the board of education, the bcc respectfully urges that the board of education require san francisco unified school district to address, implement and monitor all of the department of justice's concerns and mandateds outlined in the july 2012 letter. additionally the bcc will ask san francisco unified school district to review at the next meeting how the department of justice concerns and deliverables were addressed and action timeline for 2012 and we would love to receive any questions that you have. >> yes. vice mayor fewer. >> thank you president norton. thank you very much for this presentation. a couple of things i would like to address. i think first there has been some movement on this and thank you very much for bringing these items to our attention and actually fixing them with the translation. i can't believe that they're not translated. it seems like such a no brainer and disappointing to hear that but i am glad it's fixed with the remedy. also concerning some of our translation on our websites and the availability of having certain documents translated. tha
with our parents and share what our children are learning. >> she represents a new generation of educators that values social media. anne arundel county is about to get on board systemwide. they are drawing up a social media policy to enhance education and learning. >> we will use social media for instructional purposes. if the teacher finds a youtube video, we could unblock youtube. they could use it in the lesson. they currently cannot do that. >> educators will create a high- tech path for learning. social media has already gotten a past. >> i see so many opportunities to connect with classrooms across the country and the world. if opens up so many doors for my students. >> these social media policy will not go on the books without language to protect students. it will draw the line on how students and educators communicate, but they're also be exceptions in cases where administrators and parents have given written permission. this is the first reading of the social media policy. if approved by the school board, it would go on the books this fall. we have a draft of that proposal on our
what was important in life. education being the primary importance and if i heard once i must have heard everyday in my childhood education opens the door of opportunity for you. it took me a while to realize that that's not the only thing it does for you. it also enriches you as a person. but she also taught me what i think the most important thing and that's to be caring about people. now, my mom didn't understand public service in the way that i've participated in it. sort of didn't lead community boards or lead -- >> rose: she probably didn't have time! >> she didn't. she was raising two kids and working six days a week and trying to survive. but she showed me what it meant to care about people. i detail in the book how my mother was a local nurse to the projects in the co-op city where we lived, how giving she was to everyone she's met. and i learned from her example that that was an important value in life to give to others. >> rose: did you also learn in your experience that you cannot do it alone? >> oh, gosh, that's what the whole book is about. it's how i stand on the sho
it done. and that brings me arrest warrant why we're here today. a college track and education. i hear from businesses that they're number one priority is education. they would like nothing better to hire san franciscans but they often struggle to find their candidates. and it's clear to me the only way our city will continue to be strong is if we support the improvement of our city schools. in many cities they choose to address the keegs challenges by picking fights and appointing fingers but once again not in 90 san francisco. together we strive for excellence in our public schools not excused. last year, i met with our community leaders the first time in our memories the mayor and others and we all agree that technology, expediting our kids earlier with the expectation for college and seth them to in our economies is the keys key to success and we're making progress. san francisco unified continues to be the hive urban development are high. we've seen double digit high-grades among our latin and africa kids >> results are being recognized for our achievement we received a federal g
will also need to seriously address the root causes of violence, and what are those root causes? education and here i am speaking of after school services, adult education, skills development, ged services, and parent education. another being employment, and here i am speaking of jobs, job training, and job readiness, and finally family services, and here i am speaking of intervention,at risk services, family counseling, reentry services, and victim services. unless these root causes are made priorities and supported with the resources needed our prayers will not be realized nor will our success be attained. common to all our faith traditions is the belief that the greatness of a civilization will ultimately be judged by this and i believe we can show by our works the best of san francisco values. thank you. [applause] >> thank you again. as reverend joe calwell comes for the closing prayer let me thank the mayor and as reverend jackson said calling the family together. i will remind you we all have a role to play and if you're part of the faith community the mayor is asking to you j
out and educating businesses right now. the likelihood you'll by looking at the bigger side of our business >> director i believe if more than your business is one second for it will be taxed at a different rate and i make everything i sell. so i'm making it and selling it. right but you're also whole sailing >> yeah, but wholesale and retail are in the same bracket. by definition the - so i look like a retailer but i'm a manufacturer if you proportion the dollars >> well, is your margin bigger than air manufacturing costs it will be interesting to find out how they find this. >> look by definition your whole sailing it and selling it. >> not every manufacture will have a manufacturer presence. >> yeah, so this is - anyway pointing out. >> again we're not going out and promoting this yet base we're still talking about this and there will be an awe apportionment but they'll be some guidelines on. >> i have a question. saying there is a small business exemption for gross receipts less than one million but on the second page it shows the gross rates is from zero to one million
to tick now. this is going to be a yearlong educational project. we have the tables set up at flavors if we can get a table but it can start answering some of the questions. >> and perhaps we'll be meeting sometime next week but we could look at this as a potential workshop. >> thank you. >> mr. president, can we call public comment on the gross receipts tax? seeing none public comment is closed. >> update and the small business center and making comments on small business activities. >> so commissioners this morning mayor lee gave his city address and this is the first address as he being mayor. while there were numerous items when he went through all the things awe employment over the last year but business-related he talked about the gross receipts and passage and the collective work on creating that piece of legislation and the unanimous sport around that. no need the growth of manufacturing the increasing of funding for lending programs that the city is doing and soon by the end of this month through mid february i think we may be getting the announcement about the mid loan
to the board of education to a demonstration about tobias, this good worker who put his all into the students at the school and this principal that pit this child down. i couldn't wrap my mind around that. here she is on the loud speaker talking about peace and justice and wearing white t shirts but i'm taking my retirement time because i'm retired to head down to demonstrate against someone like that. it just didn't fit. now, i am wearing this t shirt "stop the killing. start the healing" , a campaign we had in the 80's. it started in the 80's with ben verrein where we were trying to get gun legislation and things going. we didn't wait until a bunch of white kids got killed in connecticut. we have been trying to get our community straight all that time. these children are suffering from ptsd and there should be a way they should be taken care of, the way the principal was telling that child is not the way, and if that is what you have running these schools you need to rethink who you hire, and who you have over our children, and i would thank you to do just that. check with barbara g
education department but, you know, as just xooend the communication we had over the few months i think one of the things we look at is that kindergartner enter into our school system we see the gap and their such on incredibly important piece and the staff that have championed it have made a real difference. i hope that as we have more discussions around prop h that we really have a robust discussions on how to fund prek. we're dealing with this head on before our young school children enter the program. and i want to thing our staff none of you look old enough to have been around for thirty years. this says a lot about our program so thank you four all your work. >> thank you colleagues. at this time why do we move on >> now is the opportunity for the public to comment including the items open adaptation without reference to collapsed. please remember that the items are that were arrested talked about are not available now. >> i want to to say that (inaudibl (inaudible). 49er the championship, ed lee, (inaudibl (inaudible). and mayor (inaudible) ladies and gentlemen as you know my name
for failed education systems, failed school systems to get their acts together. throughout the country there are some promising signs that we can bring schools and parents together to improve our educational system. san francisco public schools adopted a funding mechanism according to what's termed a weighted student formula. under this policy the more students a school attracts, the more money that school, its administrators and teachers receive. low-income students are weighted heavier and the funding forum as our children with disabilities, and those learning english as a second language. so there's incentives are schools to seek the more vulnerable population, and reasons for schools to differentiate themselves and to excel. imagine if we were to try and move in this direction with federal funding. allow the money we truly spend to actually follow individual children. students, including those without a lot of money for those with special needs, we be able to access a school which would give them a shot at having a successful life, a shot at earning their success and achieving thei
-- education and western thinking. she even made the short list for "time" magazine's person of the year. >>> students are putting their talents to good use. our education reporter sherrie johnson shows how they're making a difference. >> reporter: members of the laser club are hard at work. these students make anything from cabinets to chairs. the list just got a little larger thanks to city school administrators. they bought a state of the art laser machine for students. they said it raise great to see a what city students can do. >> we want them to be prepared for the future, their job. they will learn everything they need to learn on the job. they need to be able to show their employability skills. >> reporter: carve ver's laser skill has a partnership with habitat for humanity, private and public schools. they fill orders. the money for the supplies are donated and students love the experience. >> hands-on things. i love fixing stuff. it helps me. i like this. >> reporter: students showed off their handy work by presenting a plaque showcasing positive programs in baltimore schools.
three, and critically important as education and guidance. more than ever workers are responsible for saving and planning for their retirement. they need help understanding a range of financial topics from the most basic information about how to enroll and how much they should save to the more complex topics such as proper asset allocation and in come planning. workers had received guidance take action and have better outcomes. our data shows that workers who engage in a retirement planning session as and nexium pulled either online or on the phone increase their deferral rates on average by five to six percentage points. one thing that is constant in all of our research is that a majority of workers want and need help. workers also need a simple way to gauge their savings process. last fall fidelity released new research on age based savings guidelines. these guidelines serve as a framework for establishing the retirement savings goals as workers progress through their careers, their salary, time a factor of x can be one of the measures used to assess the retirement savings progr
'll advance proposals aimed at producing results in areas like education, health health, innovation, and job growth. our solutions will be based on the conservative principles of self-reliance, faith in the individual, trust in family, and accountability in government. our goal is to ensure that every american has a fair shot to earn success and achieve their dreams. it's my hope that i can stand before you two years from now and report you that our side, as well as the president's, found within us the ability to set differences aside in order to provide relief to so many millions of americans who just want their life to work again. in so many countries in history, children were largely confined to the same station in life as their parents, but not here. because here we've seen the son of a shoe man become the president of the united states. we have seen a daughter of a poor single mom develop and build a company that turned into her being the oregon of a tv network. in america, the grandson of poor immigrants, who fled russia, come here, and that grandson became the majority leader of the h
budget is up to 20% and the next decade is 30% of our budget. it takes away from education, infrastructure, other health and human service needs. so medicaid and the need to have flexibility is something we are go to go watch as we go forward. let me finish where i started. we need to address the rising costs of health care. i don't think the affordable care act does that. we have provided an opportunity with our health care exchange in utah is a model based on good principles that allows businesses to provide as a benefit and health with competitive forces and consumer control to, in fact, have an impact on the rising costs of health care. it may be imperfect, but it's a step in the right direction. again, the fundamental position i'm taking and we're taking in utah is that the free market works if you allow it. and takes politicians like myself and others to be disciplined and to give time for the marketplace to work. we sometimes are so anxious to fix the problem, that we don't let the marketplace make the adjustments necessary to get the right outcome. and again as i sa
'm investing in education. personally, and with all of my administration, i personally adopted the 12 middle schools in this city to make sure that the truancy goes down, is not eliminated, that the kids who are in our middle schools have the hope, the hope that we're generating when they were in elementary school, involved with their parents, have the same kind of guidance and support as they get to critical decisionses about whether or not they see the vision of living in the city and going to college and getting the kind of education and skill sets to take on these great jobs that we're creating. i want to make sure -- yes. (applause) >> i want to make sure that our tech sf are training programs rhonda is heading up and so many others create the foundation at the skill sets to earn these new jobs. it's ecology jobs that we all see happening that pay very good salaries, that we're training people in bayview, in the western addition, in all of our city to make sure they have not only the good shots that they get those jobs as well. and that's why it's so important that all the companies in
universities and couple of them started by two stanford professors and world class education for free or near free . what are employers looking for? intelligence and drive and discipline . it used to be a college degree stood for those things and now they have faster and better ways to determine whether they want to hire someone. >> john, billions of dollars in government stub sidies for college education are worthless? >> they are worthless and i am not going to defend them but what botherings me is it a notionful a job that requires a college degree. i don't care if you want to be an investment banking analyst, there is nothing you learned in the four years that has nothing to do with the job you will eventually do . the idea that college is going to make us better or worse, jobbings are not plentiful because government is getting in the way of. >> emac a lot of the plumber jobs don't require college. but associates degrease pay more than the college jobbings. >> yes, a trade pays more. you can see it in the nuclear medicine technology. >> these are associate degrees and don't require full
in the conversation with digital media or literacy needed within the educational system. we are still experiencing digital divide and access and just the one you speak of recently officer when you mention the generations and investigators not engaged with this media and no don't know my book or face space and when you have to look at youth culture. we talk about texting and sexing and omg and i didn't text anything to you. i spoke to and part of the language and how they engage so until we look at the culture of young people and how do we impact today's 20th century media culture we can't make a huge impact in regards to bullying or electronic aggression or whatever name we want to place on it and is affecting the students and i am excited you're addressing this issue and it's a crucial time for this generation and if we don't take serious this conversation today and action tomorrow we will see more and more issues arise. [applause] >> and i'm going to cap it up and i totally agree with that and one of the resources i want you to point is out is the family institute on line and platform for good
are part of the solution. in that effort both in advocacy we have a strong, strong goal of educating our public and all the other kids and families in our city. this is a way of our quality of life, we cannot accept human trafficking. part of the way to do that is to have this be part of the kids education, and push strongly. the collaborative this year, allow the youth of san francisco to enter in a poster contest to provide artistic ability to the messaging of this really important movement. the 2013 poster contest winners i get to announce. i will begin with third-place winners. the third-place winner, first one eighth-grade student, from james brannan middle school. shelley lu (sounds like) apl(applause) also an eighth-grade student from james dunham as well, stella lee. thank you. apl(applause) (applause) to be an eighth-grader. the collaborative has chosen for the second place at 12 greater, from abraham lincoln high school. stephanie chung (applause) and then we have a number of first place winners. i'm sure this is all about collaboration, talking about it, what it means
of the bcc as well. >> [speaking spanish] >> she's our [inaudible] to you with the education on board. >> [speaking spanish] >> she's providing report to the board members. >> [speaking spanish] >> and generally we're going to decide what we're going to focus on in 2012-2013. >> [speaking spanish] >> observations that we're going to include in that report if we can are our observations regarding enrollment. >> [speaking spanish] >> thank you. >> well, superintendent carranza and board of education commissioners as you can see in our report we have a lot to celebrate and a lot of successes we have made. i am very happy to say great progress in how we are providing services for el students and families, so i think there's a lot to be -- a lot to appreciate and be thankful for. we do believe like we said in the beginning part of our report that we are working much more effectively together with san francisco unified leadership and are grateful for that and my portion of the report are the concerns that we condition to -- continue to have in the bcc and in reviewing the letter to the sa
, these kids are not scholars. they are not someone who comes from an educational background or was taught that in their household. they do not know how to differentiate how to make the right choices. they just know what they have been taught. i am speaking from personal experience. i went to high school and i graduated with a 1.7 gpa. we ran the school, literally. i went to kennedy high school in richmond. it is surrounded by three or four different components. constant shootings -- three or four different hoods. we had to have our varsity football games during school hours. we cannot have it at 7:00 because of the potential danger. there was constant substitute teachers, a lot of bucks. -- lack of books. this is what they are teaching us. not saying that it is a total reason for why it and others turn out the way that we turned out, but it plays a part. just like i have to be held accountable for the choices i make, and so does a society. >> i keep hearing the term gang. in the black community in the bay area, it is a community, it is not a gang. you can move up in their ranks as if you
of two members of the board of education, former members, one of which is mr. matthew haney. [applause] and the other is student delegate windy ly who is not here tonight but windy was one of the members last year. we also want to give a shout out to four people that were on the peace kag last spring and moved onto other projects but we want to acknowledge their time. i am not sure if they're here tonight but carolyn granner. steve cook. [applause] steven was co-chair for quite some time providing some great leadership. all right. and another student, hannah lee. i'm not sure she's here tonight so that concludes our certificates of recognition. let's give them a hand for their hard work please. [applause] thank you very much. >> as a point of personal privilege later in the meeting we have the moment where we announce new people to our committees and mine is in the audience and mark will be joining the sac and mark will you stand up. [applause] any other comments from the board? >> yes. so as a past member of the kak for many years i know the time and dedication it takes. i wan
is that within the education budget we have prioritized the per pupil funding so that has been a reduction in per pupil funding because i think it's very important schools can see forward to future years, the source -- a source of budget they will have. the second thing we've done is obviously for the academy program is to encourage the devolution of more of the schools budget to the schools directly and i still think there's more that we can achieve on that agenda. >> mr. speaker, the prime minister said he would give the public a strong voice in the nhs. his former health secretary said he would have since of the nhs. why then -- [inaudible] rejected by the government last night? >> we do want to see patients have a stronger voice in the nhs and we are about to debate i think at some length some terms of the staff how that is done. i think one of the most important ways is going to be making sure that the mandates of the nhs commission board has at its heart quality nursing, or day care, and the voice of patients. we also need to look at how health watch is going to work to make sure it is tru
of my dad imprisoned and now pursuing my education, i would say there is not one answer. the answer is that there is not an answer. you have brought about by bringing this conversation forum. it is not just law enforcement perspective, it is not just the community-based perspective, it is not just the research perspective, it is a multi- layered approach. first and foremost, we do have to consider meeting youth where they are act. we are talking about perpetrators of violence or what not or system involved or involved in gangs, we have to meet them where they are at. pain and hurt produces more hurt, right? what is fundamental it is addressing back pain -- addressing that pain. not looking at folks in a punitive way and saying, this guy is notorious, we have to lock him up. that person is hurting. he might have been abused, you know. first and foremost, we need to meet that individual's needs. i am pursuing a master's in social work. i have that lens. we need to heal our communities and take those answers upon ourselves. everybody has already -- we sure this in perspective, but defi
today calling for change. he wants republicans to focus more on issues like education and health care and spend less time talking about the deficit. congressman cantor is with us this morning. >> good morning. >> you've got a big speech today asking the republican party to change. is this about tone or ideology? >> what this is about is about making sure that we can express why we're doing what we're doing. we believe very strongly obviously in things like fiscal discipline and not spending money you don't have we also believe in that, because it helps people, in the same way we've got to address the plight of so many working americans right now, and those who don't have any work and say that yes, we've got policies that will help you in terms of giving you an opportunity for quality education, in terms of trying to help you bring down the costs of health care. we've got some real policies that we want to put to work to help people and that's what this is about. >> so on policy and on immigration reform will you today endorse the proposal put forward by senator
avoid having to pay for an education that isn't even yours. we begin tonight tracking more snow. for now the skies are clear and cool, and winter weather is headed our way. . >> temperatures keep dropping. there's still enough breeze to give you a wind-chill factor. even by february standards, we're feeling it out there. take a look at the numbers. you can see 21 in baltimore, but still room to fall tonight. 22 in easton. as we look at the overall wind speed, it's still 10-15. so it feels like single digits. cambridge 12 above, about as cold as it gets in winter in maryland. our next weather maker already developing out to the west. pretty heavy snow west of chicago, and this system headed our way. we'll talk about the window of time it will arrive over your super bowl weekend straight ahead. >>> we know more about a death at the aberdeen proving grounds. george lazaro junior died during a routine dive. the cause has not been determined. the army says it is investigating. >>> tonight begins 30 years in prison for a maryland man who ran an online child porn bulletin board. he's from balti
, and he turned the country upside down and told us that we did not need to go through formal education. we all needed to learn from farmers and workers, and that was how we would get reeducated. it was the biggest persecution of educated families. tavis: so at eight years old, you ended up in a dormitory, and you are looking out for your little sister, at the age of age. take me back to the dormitory and tell us how like sort of begins anew for you in this camp, as it were. >> yes. in the beginning, it was really confusing and scary, because we did not have food. the room had no wash basin, no kitchen facility, and we were taken to the soccer field to witnessed the killing of teachers, and we were brainwashed that we were nobody, and we were born with black blood, as part parents were called that. >> what becomes your daily routine when you are 8 years old? 8, 9, 10? >> the first few months was chaos. we were nobody. then i think about one year later, i was assigned to work in the factory. some of the older kids got sent, but i was too young. i went to a factory, and then later i learned h
. >> going to our school, is a ticket to educational success. john: this woman runs several charter schools, all get outstanding test scores. you do this with the same money that public schools get. >> we do it with less, 4 and 6,000-dollars less per child. john: how did they get them so interested? in math and ? >> yes. >> and reading. >> and writing. john: learning is work. >> it don't matter? john: the school day here is longer. kidding stay until 5:00 p.m. >> charter teachers can be asked to work more than union would have allowed, they don't mind. john: i are going to burn out, why are you not ticked off? >> that is not an option for us, we have the high end of the prize with the kids. john: they have new teacher techniques, sometimes teachers wear earpieces in class, and coached by bosses. >> they tell me things that i don't see, if i don't think of a great question if the moment, my principal feeds it to me through the earpiece. >> we view teachers as athletes in the olympics they need support and coaching, to be at' top of their game. john: these kids wave their hands around, it con
, that education, job training, paying attention to housing, poverty, isolation, all of those elements lead to the uptick in violence. that's actually quite a strong lesson for all of us mayors to learn as we ask each other for help in solving this. and i want to thank all of you in this audience from adult probation, juvie probation, inter98 (inaudible) for helping me carve what we can do in this city. many of you know i've been a champion for jobs and i truly believe job creation and better economics is going to be a big answer. but it isn't the only answer because i quickly realized, i can't give a dead kid a job in this city. there's no answer for that. we've got to find better answers for people who are confronted with decisions they have to make to not take the violent road for that decision. and it starts early and many of you reminded me, start now, mayor, start investing in education. start investing in community based ways in which we can reduce the attitude that violence can resolve something. and then make sure we work with our health departments and our medical experts to
. the other thing that we are moving towards in education is more digital. we'll see less textbooks and more digital learning and with that we are promoting a digital literacy policy which deals with a number of issues and i'm going to go back and look at the draft policy to see how well it deals with the kind of issues rob and your family have dealt with in terms of using the internet safely and being aware of the harm you can do to yourself and to others by the way digital news can get around. >> assemblyman. >> thank you very much. i'm very, very heartened. this was an issue that's been in the closet for too long. i think high profile nationally now as well and we have super stars involved, lady gaga, myself, but you got to reach young people. usually peers are the best, i think, in terms of communicating things and then absolutely the parents. let's keep working, i'm only as good as the information i have and so we want to do the most effective long-lasting legislation. you know what happens sometimes, something is written in law but the attitudes don't change. so that is the human
that his dream and his words and the education that we have from dr. king stays alive for generations to come. so, this is truly an amazing event today. dr. king in 1967 asked, where do we go from here? and today we're still asking that same question. where do we go from here? well, we still have people suffering in our community, people in the african-american community. where do we go from here when we have lost numbers of african americans in san francisco? where do we go from here? well, i'll tell you where we go from here. (applause) >> we change policy of the city. we change policy, and we start to be progressive, truly progressive about the policies we push to make african americans feel welcomed in this city. so, where do we go from here? we start to make aggressive efforts to educate our young people. we take ownership of our community. we take ownership of our children. we support each other instead of pointing the finger. where do we go from here? (applause) >> there is much work to do. as supervisor cohen and i cannot do it alone, we need your support. we need your encoura
or the schools? educate is not schooling. schooling is the institutional matrix, institutional matrix that receives the urge to learn and then distribute it, distributes it culturally. ostensibly based on merit but learn something for a life-style. that's what you do when you figure out your life situation and figure out what to do in regard to how you continue to learn and flute ture and grow your mind over the space of a lifetime. so the point is that we got these institutions that are making judgements about our children and that we are complicit in without stepping up to the plate to intervene. and so i'm so glad you all are doing that with knowledge, with insight, with savvy and also with critical acumen give to you over a lifetime. we need to use this in behalf of our children so that they won't be sent off. because one person gets hit on the back of the hand and told not to do it anymore. drunk until a certain age. then can go on to be president. another person gets consigned to being a janitor. both got the same talent. both got the same, if barack obama had been caught doing
budget which means it takes money away from other areas like education infrastructure and other health service needs. medicaid and the need to have flexibility is going to be certainly something we will watch as we go forward. let me finish by ending where i started. we need to address the rising cost of health health health ca. i don't think the affordable care act does that. i think we have provided an opportunity with their health care exchange and utah that allows businesses to contain to provide benefits and help with competitive forces and consumer control to in fact have an impact on the rising cost of health care. it may be imperfect but it's a step i think in the right direction. again the fundamental position that i'm taking and we are taking in utah is the free market works if we will allow it. it takes politicians like himself and others out there to be disciplined and to give time for the marketplace to work. we sometimes are so i just a problem that we don't look at making adjustments that are necessary to get the right outcome. and as i said, if we want the best quality
, education, and taxes. this is 45 minutes. >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. i am the president of the american enterprise institute and i am pleased to welcome eric cantor today. it is an important policy speech entitled making life work. now, an ordinary introduction of his political career and rise to majority leader and talk about his new legislative accomplishment, his career, as most of you know, is not a collection of accomplishment, but a long-term effort to make it better, or country for all americans. here is someone who pauses to remember the why of public policy, valuing justice for all, protecting the vulnerable, and fighting against class divisions in american life. he knows that it leads to a happy and more prosperous life for more people. he cares about those who are being left behind, people that are looking for work and cannot find it. people who raised barriers of starting business and building another life. eric cantor knows that policy analysis as an american or someone who wants to become an american, is very important. here is the reason that i admire him
of the baby boom generation. and we have a 12 from kindergarten education system. it is not too late. we have about that kind of timeframe in order to start moving. if we don't move soon, it becomes almost impossible to fix this without upheaval. i happen to actually be fairly optimistic. i do think two things. i think the american sense of life, americans fundamentally don't like big government. when times seem to be moving the wrong direction, sometimes we are surprised. i think this is a nice caviar. the biggest thing that we have going for us is that we have the best ideas. the bad news is that things have railed over and over again. people tell me how surprised they were when the soviet union failed. but communism always fails. it did not surprise me at all. the question is when it does, will we be there with the right ideas to move the country in the right direction. even though i think we will win because we have the right ideas. in regards to individual objects, i think we had problems economically and problems in deviations of politics. the company did great and never had a single qu
that education and training cannot overcome intense market incentives. a vocal, point for payment reform has been mentioned. aha a committee is a secretive group of doctors that wields tremendous influence over medicare reimbursement rates. the cms and adopts nearly all of their recommendations. at a minimum, the public deserves transparency. but yet, we should establish rates of thing that is not favoring narrow specialties. the federal government and ama are colluding to bring an end to the primary care physician work force in the united states. in summary, it is clear that health insurance provides better health outcomes, including a decrease risk for death. despite this, we will leave 30 million uninsured. i have worked for over a decade in medical education as a student, resident, fellow, and a faculty member and program later. it is my conviction that public responsive training should meet the health care needs of our population, and rather than the staffing needs of hospitals or the lifestyle preferences of young doctors. >> my understanding is that senator franken has to leave, and you wa
. book early and save up to 20%. >> new change in education in california means that california is getting rid of a 15 year policy that requires eighth grade investigators tak takeal gentlemen great 1. annette reports that critic think this change is a step backwards. >> state board of education decided california eighth graders will no longer be required to take algebra 1. instead california adopted what is called common core curriculum. policy most states have moved to. students can still take algebra 1 if the districts offer it or course was elements of algebra. more opportunity for more advanced math in high school. >> this doesn't do anything to limit possibility. students can take algebra in the eighth grade same as always been able to but doesn't necessarily require them to. >> critic say schools that are struggling will choose not to offer algebra leaving low income students ill prepared for college. with 1 cird the permanent of african american enrolled went from 24 percent to 60 percent in the last nine years. for latino that triple to 63 percent. >> hard to igno
, their actual true core, it was just as a pencil sketch. education opens up doors, that's really what we try to focus on. we don't try and tell people "here is what you have to go do and here is the path ahead that you have to take." but, it's much more about creating a sense of possibility and allowing each child to dictate their own path. we build schools and increase access to education for children around the world and we have now broken ground on over a hundred schools in africa, asia and latin america. if you think about the way that the world was 50 years ago and you think about how the world is going to look 50 years from now, i cannot imagine that every single child thats born doesn't have some opportunity to have access to quality education. the schools that we build and will continue to build will be a very important piece to that puzzle, but it's innovation through technology that's going to be able to reach the masses in ways that we have never been able to do so before. and so a big part of pencils of promise going forward is going to be investment in education technology for t
from president clinton is this public leadership, this education function? >> i really agree with that and i think that people used -- people in your business really used to complain about the president's length of his state of the unions. but really he thought of that as a time where i can really lay this out, i can slain to people what i'm trying to achieve, i can reup my contract with the american people about what's positive, his job approval as i said always went up when he did that. but i think that really is a critical element of what a president needs to do in the second term. the other thing he needs to do is use the full force of his executive power. when it comes to moving on clean energy and climate change, when it comes to implementing health care, when it comes to many of the president's other priorities, he's not going to get a lot of help from the republicans on capitol hill, but he can achieve success through the deft use now in the process of building out his second term cabinet, more use of the cabinet to try to get those things done. i think it will be cri
to be an assessment made. they are going to try to acquire education or knowledge about what happened there and whether it was gang related. currently if that happens, and we have gone through this past weekend as soon as there is an assessment made of the situation, whereby we believed that it was gang related. we will do the redeployment and each week we sent out a schedule and it goes out to the violence reduction team and our swat team and our honda unit and it puts our trouble hot spots on the map and it is not only for gang involved shootings, but for robberies or different crimes that are occurring during the weekend so we want to sat rate these different areas and so i break it down across the board. a lot of times these lieutenants are the captains of the certain districts they called and needed help on the robbery issues. so we are going to sat rate that area, and things of that effect. we are going to be sat rating some of our areas with gang problems. what we found on this past week and we seen it several times and there is a retaliation. we broke down and redeployed to th
. without too many houses, houses never face. we should've invested in technology, manufacturing, education. we should've spent less and save more. we should've borrowed this from foreigners. the important thing people don't get, housing this consumption because people individually think they invested in the house. we can assume a house like another mobile. what they're really doing is over consuming. we had a massive overconsumption. it's analogous to eating the seed corn as analogous. protect millions of people headed to the the wrong thing. we talked and honda both houses to the mortgage bankers, presidential legal attorney. those millions of people try to learn how to do something it's productive in a global economy. in addition, construction which is their competitive. you try that manufacturing wages, which we did with this artificial construction boom in miniature of millions of manufacturing jobs overseas to places they can have china and initially people in india and china didn't know how to do the work while. for having a really difficult time getting those jobs back. they make a
the post counseling session after they do primary language assessment at the educationals placement center. we also send out one copy to every english learner in the district. >> and other questions? >> any other comments or questions from the board? mr. superintendent. >> thank you president norton. i want to take this opportunity to publicly thank them for their work. the san francisco unified school district as the commissioners know is parts of the great council of the city schools and the largest urban school systems in the country and i sit on the executive committee on the council and i am so proud when we get an opportunity to share what we're doing in san francisco around educating english language learners, what we're doing with the work of the pathways but most importantly when i share the work that the bcc does with my colleagues across the country. we tend to be prophets everywhere except our own land but i want you to know there is no other system doing what the bcc is doing and that is testament to the work they have done with us in a transparent manner so thank you for a
the money on the 25-year term demanded by his education secretary? will he speak in plain language, maybe in latin, to the education secretary? perhaps he might say -- optamus schola nova, we need a new school? >> i'll leave the latin to the mayor of london but would have a word with the education secretary. what i would say to him is it you look at school capital budget as a whole, they are equivalent to what the previous labor government did in their early terms. the money is there. in terms of the banks, the funding lending scheme from the bank of england, evidence shows it is having an effect on lowering interest rates and reforming p.f.i. but also offering infrastructure guarantees, something the treasury never has done before to help projects go ahead. >> damian hinds? >> nothing is more important in the early years education than the caring people delivering it. does the prime minister agree raising the bar and elevating their status will help the prestige to the profession and help parents give children the best start in life? >> i think my honorable friend is absolutely light and
like to say safety should be first and foremost along with quality education, quality and experienced staff. we can close the achievement gap and superintendent i like to work with you as i said before so please reach out to me. thank you. >> yes hi good afternoon. i am tory cane. i am a t10 security. i have been exonerated after going through a long process but i am sure you've heard all of the problems mlk and administrator stuff so i would like to move on. i want to move on with my life and these issues, and i would like to say they believe in the board of education. i believe in what it stands for and i also know that sometimes we get off on the wrong foot if things go wrong but we learn through those issues and i would like to just go forward from this point. things happened. okay. but as i'm standing here i think about security in the schools and we get such a bad rap because we're very low on the totem poll and called when we're needed and in essence we put on life on the line for students, our ourselves and the administration and staff. some years ago, long ago me and
on their feet or even work force development or educational opportunities to help a mother who is homeless, for example, to get on their feet, we need much more of that, and we cannot cut programs that will increase the roles of the homeless. i believe that the project homeless connect and some of the projects created by previous administrations are not enough. we need to look at transitional housing but also continuing the type of support to help people get back on their feet. the job training and other types of programs that the mayor's office of economic and workforce of all men are working on are really important to ensure that unemployed people and potentially homeless people can be trained in the new green economy and green jobs. there is also a lot of other types of work force development being done, but i think it has to be targeted at some of the lowest income, highest vulnerability populations in our city, and that would help prevent homelessness from growing. but i hope that as we look at homeless policy, we take a man approached that does not blame homeless people for their own
almost four years ago as an educational arm of their work. and we would have dinners and a few classes and we understood there what momentum that people wanted this type of engagement and education in a way that allowed for a more in-depth conversation. we grew and now we offer -- i think we had nine, we have a series where adults learned home cooking and we did a teacher training workshop where san francisco unified public school teachers came and learned to use cooking for the core standards. we range all over the place. we really want everyone to feel like they can be included in the conversation. a lot of organizations i think which say we're going to teach cooking or we're going to teach gardening, or we're going to get in the policy side of the food from conversation. we say all of that is connected and we want to provide a place that feels really community oriented where you can be interested in multiple of those things or one of those things and have an entree point to meet people. we want to build community and we're using food as a means to that end. >> we have a wonderful or
of education and a final decision will be made no word on how many schools that maybe. live tonight in washington park. from chicago to west chicago special closed door session the board of education got going earlier this evening the district 33 board resulting in a strike to let out 4000 students today how can we hold on to teachers if we have a school board that isn't willing to work with us? i'm sure the union is also disappointed the board reportedly said what the teachers are asking for is beyond what neighboring districts say the smoke was detected the plane turned back to o'hare one person on board was taken to the hospital for shortness of breath all 38 passengers landed safely. it is the first homicide in aurora and over here next prosecutors say three teenagers are responsible president obama brings his gun reform control plan to the west. why free wifi access coast-to- coast may soon be a reality. this was the fourth consecutive day of measurable snow in the area but the arctic air is easing its grip on the area and our next storm system is targeting areas farther north
the work his foundation is doing to address challenges in global health and education across the globe. i spoke to the man who made microsoft at the world economic forum in davos last week. in the road aweighedhead for the company he founded and his success successor, steve bammer. >> tech leaders, those are hard jobs. amazing things. be great. >> microsoft has not had an easy time recently. would you ever return to the front office? >> i'm engaged adds chairman on a part-time basis but my full-time work for the rest of my life will be the foundation work. microsoft has a lot of exciting things going on. it's a competitive field. windows 8 has done well. surface computers are doing well. so i share lots of ideas about where office should go and, you know, i think the field as a whole should be proud of how quickly it's moving and microsoft is lead in a lot of those areas. >> you and melinda have given away some $28 billion through your found dags. your fortune is still more than $68 billion. where do you see your work now? >> well, we're committed to the diseases that affect the poorest,
there as police officers. we are into education and training. we are not looking to enforce. we tried to instill the idea that the security plan is paramount, providing the framework by which an establishment protect itself from inappropriate behavior and criminal acts for a working relationship with the community and the police. there is that umbrella of security and personnel. we looked at the management to hire the appropriate personnel. hiring, training, and supervision. everything that you need. all of our problems come from the over service of alcohol. we ask for owners to train for over service. we also look for physical security measures, like scanning. additional parking and security of the exterior is important. we think that an ongoing plan management -- constantly as cds nightclub owners assessing management. it is readjusted when necessary. the bottom line is they have a great security plan and they will limit their liability. it is all about making money and defending yourself against liability. that is what we try to preach to club owners and management personnel. >> thank you. wh
representing a wide area of government agencies, law enforcement agencies, service providers, educators and community members. we are committed to ending human trafficking through collaboration, education, outreach, raising awareness and supporting survivors of human trafficking. how many cities have this kind of public private cooperation? i don't know but we are among the first and speaks about the efforts put forth in the city but isn't this the city where all things that are impossible can happen? i wanted to just a few people who are here. first and foremost the honorable mayor ed lee. and supervisor carmen chu, has been a great champion. the winners of the sf cat annual poster concert and the keynote speaker, -- a human traffic survivor and advocate. i want to say that other human rights commissioners are here, -- and vice chair doug chen, -- commissioner, the president julie -- nancy kirshner rodriguez, police chief greg sur (sounds like) -- i will like to turn this over to mayor lee.diana are you here? he is on his way. well - thank you. why don't we do that? why waste a
that deny economic opportunities to women and girls, rooted in education and business and investment are not going to be as prosperous as they might otherwise be. so it became clear that if i was going to be traveling around talking about diplomacy and development, urging changes in economic structures, introducing what we call economic statecraft to be a central pillar of our foreign policy you had to talk outomen and girls and so i've tried to do that. >> restrictions on women's economic participation are costing us massive amounts of economic growth and income in every region of the world. >> this work, ensuring that women are equal partners, as they should be, and are free to realize their own god-given potential, was one of the great pieces of unfinished business of the 21st century. with this equal futures partnership, we are taking an important step toward trying to finish that business. through this initiative, governments from around the world are making concrete commitments to support women in two key areas -- political participation and economic opportunity. >> have you go
that and actually ran for the board of education here in san francisco. i got a term on the school board working for families in our public school system and actually worked for the lawyers community and i came to the board of supervisors. >> why did you choose to live in san francisco? supervisor kim: you know, i do not know if i have a good answer for that. i just wanted to try it out. >> tell me what motivated your interest in politics. supervisor kim: that is a tough question to answer. i never had any intention to get involved in the electoral process. >> really? supervisor kim: i was always politically active. i was always working on statewide initiatives, and i worked on several campaigns. i worked as an organizer. i did not really have an interest in an electoral process, because -- i just have this perception the process was 30, and when i went to the ballot to vote, it looked like i was taking the better of two evils. i did not have a strong interest. working as an organizer, you get to know issues surrounding budget for schools or housing, and i began to see people were really accessi
to be working on educating chris and his family and friends about the work that we do and the power of words and educating him on the importance of using words and understanding that predjudice and fear and hate that our young lesbian, gay bisexual and transgender youth face, many times on a daily basis. >> reporter: it is unclear how long the culliver's training will last or exactlly when he will go in but trevor project officals say they are happy that he has made the decision to attend their education program. i'm jeff bush in the castro district of san francisco, kron four news. >> lots of clouds but we did clear things out. notice that rain out of southern california. that the system is missing us. with high clouds that prevented a low clouds on the surface from burning away today. we did see temperatures cooler. but now those clouds are going to the east and clearing things out. those low clouds for tonight. i think that it will clear quicker with more sunshine, tomorrow. this live look with partly cloudy conditions for tonight. look for low clouds, dense fog but mostly sunny. i will l
for this honor and having me here and peer resource program is a program that allows the youth to educate their peers and we cover topics such as peer pressure, self esteem, sexiel decision making and my class is working in racism and we work on how to combat interpersonal and racism and we get to pick the topics that we want to learn about, but personally pier resources is not just a program to do extra circular activities and i can open up. i surround myself with people from different backgrounds. i feel i'm a leader and can compete in the top ton ivy league schools and i can take on everything and i want to thank her for her help and i never thought i would be up here speaking and i am thankful for being here and let's go 49ers. [applause] >> any comments from the board? well, i will just say on behalf of the board how much we appreciate the work of peer resources for our students and thank you to the commissioners for bringing forth the commendation. might i request on behalf of the board if the authors allow us add our names to your resolution. thank you. oh yes commissioner wynn
to come to the city and council to defray the costs and acts of service and to educate small businesses on action steps to achieve accessibility compliance. dbi is meeting with the office of small business to determine the most appropriate use of these very limited funds. and which are the result of passage of senate bill, 1186 by the state legislature last september so that is something that is important to us based on the conversations in the past. >> acting director, director and i have recently met with the office of small business to executive director to discuss ongoing compliance issues around the number of vacant commercial storefronts. >> it does not appear that it could effectively address, vacant storefronts especially in buildings otherwise occupied. we remain available for follow up discussions on these issues. these conversations are helpful and we obviously can't accomplish the goals all of the time. but at least the communication we can come up with creative ways of assisting these issues to the department. >> dbi along with other departments is participating in the data
. that there is one more thing. so the educational system in college. i think there should be services for financial aid for individuals with disabilities. as you are abruptly thrown into the world with lots of action going on and it's a very hard transition. particularly if you are furthering your education, for folks with disabilities, particularly with financial aid. this is why most individuals don't go to college. that is all, thank you. >> thank you. are there any council members who have a comment or question? go ahead idell. >> thank you. thank you everyone for coming out here today. i have to apologize, i have been sick, so i didn't even know that the meeting would have happened. i would have had a lot more people here. sorry about that, but the next time we do this, which i know this won't be last one, it will be go. what i wanted to say is having access -- she was talking about the internet -- having cable or something at a reasonable price. we have people with disabilities and seniors just siting this their house just looking at wall because they cannot afford cable or a telephone
, i regretted making that comment. it was great to hear jim say when you look at education, you look at the programs, traveling around the world, that there is one constant. there are people and technology that say this is a place they want to be. entrepreneurs say this is where they want to be. when companies like facebook are started at an institution like harvard and a pier, you start to recognize why this is so special and fiber and why innovation is a bleeding heart economy. so let me try to give some brief introductions about our panel today. i have to confess, i only just met one of our panelists, lee said dyson, the ceo of coverity. she got a ph.d. in physics from mit but felt the urge to come out here to california and she did her research at stanford and lawrence berkeley. that is an indication we are getting smart people like her out to california to start companies like hers. 15 employees in 2008. it is interesting, we talk about cloud computing and these technology companies, but she takes electronic waste that is rich in carbon and recycles that into oil for plastics an
of -- [unintelligible] it means i have been educated with women. when were very important for me, my grandmother, my mother. they give me and show me threw themselves an example of what women wear. women that were strong, a clever, human. and at the same time, sometimes stronger than men. so that i realized very quickly that women could be more interesting, more clever, because of maybe education or maybe because of the fact that they have not played football, to be quiet, you know, more into things to obtain. to obtain something. they have to be 10 times more clever than the men. they have everything it themselves already at the base. >> that we already know we are 10 times more intelligent. [laughter] >> yes. i mean, like, men did not realize that most of the time. even if the need. the need, you know. so that, you know, truly, i felt the power of the woman. at the time, also like the woman at sleeve and that kind of thing. we admit -- we -- women reacting on taking out the bra and putting it on fire. the fire of the bra. a symbol. showing that we are as much as the men. maybe we first tried to lo
are politically motivated. >>> a pakistani girl shot for advocating women's rights and education has released a video thanking people for their support. she recorded the message before undergoing another operation at a hospital in the united kingdom. >> i'm getting better day by day. it's because of the prayers of people, and because of these prayers, and because of these prayers, god has given me this new life. >> malala shot in the head by the pakistani taliban as she left school last october. the 15-year-old was critically wounded and flown to britain for treatment. malala discharged last month, but on saturday, back in the hospital for another five-hour operation. doctors reconstructed the left side of her skull, with a metal plate. they also inserted a small electronic device to restore her hearing. the message released was the first since the attack. she expressed determination to continue the fight for the education of women and girls. >> i want to serve. i want to serve the people, and i want every girl, every child to be educated. >> reporter: the hospital says malala's most recent s
for the civillyctionver advertise public education program. so, i think she brings a really diverse amount of knowledge with her in terms of communities around california which can be applied here in san francisco, having granted, i don't know, how many millions of dollars to programs that benefited ethnic minority communities throughout the state of california. also, she is currently one of the representatives from the historic preservation commission to a joint committee appointed by the planning commission and the hpc to find a new secretary for both commissions. so, she's been the co-chair of that committee and they are now entering into the final phases of the search for a new secretary, and i think it would be appropriate to continue to have her on the historic preservation commission so she can continue her work there. also, lastly, she is also the executive director for the berg en foundation. i think she's the only person that can stand toe to toe with mr. burton. not head to head, maybe, but toe to toe, and she can swear as much as he can. but she is actually very civil in public hearings, a
the criminals who are perpetrating these crimes and educating the public on how we can all, protect ourselves understanding that the police cannot be everywhere at the same time. >> we will have several speakers that will provide us with information about the state of the world in this particular area and what we are doing to address the problem. we have representatives from the police department, district attorney office, and from the mta. we did, anticipate that the ctia, wireless association would be able to attend unfortunately at the last minute there was an aunavoidable conflict and not able to be here today. i do know that both the police department and the da's office continued to work very closely with wireless carriers to coordinate and to see what we can do to make these targets or to make these phones and these tablets less appealing targets and i know that there has been a lot of talk about bricking, and finding ways for the phones to actually just be killed remotely. so that they don't have any value. i am sure that we will hear about that today. so colleagues, if there is no in
to the hearing process. we use it as an opportunity to educate the public even when i'm a rule against them i try to give them an explanation about why i have reached that conclusion and what they might do to obtain assistance. i know the last hearing there was a woman who spoke chinese. and she brought a flyer. it was written in chinese. she really needed assistance. i was able to communicate with them. next time she should bring an interpreter or someone who can help her through the communication process. >> i assume we also provide interpretation if requested in advance? >> don -- would be the person to respond. >> maybe donna can address that after we hear from the applicant. it is very important that we provide interpreters ourselves. >>that has been an issue. >> especially for language involved. >> thank you very much. >>thank you. >>next we have ms. louisa mendoza. >> good afternoon to the panel ladies and gentlemen. my name is louisa mendoza, resident of san francisco for over 25 years. from south america via the caribbean. i am seeking a permanent appointment. also substituting in the bo
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